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Daily Digest – November 10th

In Daily Digest on November 11, 2009 at 12:11 am

EarthWorld Energy Outlook 2009: Business As Usual Unsustainable

The world is on course for a six degrees Celsius (10.8 F) temperature rise and rising energy costs, if business as usual is continued, the International Energy Agency (IEA) concludes in the report World Energy Outlook 2009 published on Tuesday.

Ban Ki-Moon heads to Washington to push for climate deal

Ban plans to meet with key senators and White House officials to discuss how governments are approaching the climate negotiations “and what those governments expect, in terms of the role of the United States,” the secretary-general’s top adviser on climate change said Monday.

Lula to Obama and Hu Jintao “Time to show some leadership in Copenhagen”

Brazil’s president has challenged other world leaders to attend next month’s climate talks in Copenhagen to break the deadlock in negotiations to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

 

States on the Front Line of climate change weigh in

The “ climate divide” between countries that are rich and poor, insulated from climate impacts and vulnerable to them, was on vivid display in the Maldives over the last few days. Countries that consider themselves most threatened by human-driven global warming — mainly places exposed to the sea or reliant on rainfall — concluded a forum there and issued a declaration of their concerns and demands.

Extreme weather predicted to hit Yangtze River

Rising temperatures over the next few decades will unleash storms, floods and drought across China’s Yangtze River Basin, a new report says, raising the prospect of catastrophe for a region that is home to nearly a third of the country’s population.

NY Times new interactive feature on Copenhagen

Leaders from nine major faiths presents UN with 60 recommendations for lessening carbon emissionsIn December, leaders from around the world will meet in Denmark to try to negotiate a new international climate treaty. As the meeting approaches, The New York Times has been asking government officials, lobbyists, industry executives and others what they think the result might be.In December, leaders from around the world will meet in Denmark to try to negotiate a new international climate treaty. As the meeting approaches, The New York Times has been asking government officials, lobbyists, industry executives and others what they think the result might be.In December, leaders from around the world will meet in Denmark to try to negotiate a new international climate treaty. As the meeting approaches, The New York Times has been asking government officials, lobbyists, industry executives and others what they think the result might be.

Leaders of nine major faiths have presented 60 ideas for lessening carbon emissions to the United Nations after Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon singled out the religious community as key in fighting climate change.

Africa: Copenhagen and Food Security

For the 193 national delegations gathering in Copenhagen for the U.N. Climate Change Conference in December, the reasons for concern about climate change vary widely. For delegations from low-lying island countries, the principal concern is rising sea level. For countries in southern Europe, climate change means less rainfall and more drought. For countries of East Asia and the Caribbean, more powerful storms and storm surges are a growing worry. This climate change conference is about all these things, and many more, but in a very fundamental sense, it is a conference about food security.

Business and Industry “at the table” approach

Protesters drenched by an October downpour gathered outside Bangkok’s United Nations Conference Center recently, shouting through bullhorns and denouncing countries for the weak commitments they’ve shown in negotiating a treaty to curb greenhouse gases. Inside, the atmosphere was more businesslike: professionals lingering around coffee bars, smiling at familiar faces, and grasping hands in recognition. Later, they would meet behind closed doors in a conclave dominated by representatives of the world’s top energy companies

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